New film released about the 2014 bird of prey mass poisoning on the Black Isle in Scotland

New film released about the 2014 bird of prey mass poisoning on the Black Isle in Scotland

Like This Video 1506 wildtalkadmin
Added by October 22, 2015

(Scroll down for film)

In 2014, 22 birds of prey including 16 red kites were found dead in one small area of the Black Isle in the north of Scotland.

It was the largest number of raptors suspected of being poisoned in one incident ever reported in Scotland and highlighted the continued persecution of birds prey by gamekeepers and farmers.

The scale of the attack shocked the conservation community who had been working hard for many years to bring a halt to wildlife crime.

Police Scotland were accused at the time being slow to react and not taking the crime seriously enough. Many locals say they know why and who committed the crime. However, one year on there has been no convictions and the case remains officially unsolved.

Li Marley’s short film documents the case and raises the question “Why is the illegal persecution of protected birds of prey and other wildlife still happening in the UK and why are people still being allowed to get away it?”.

 

Similar Videos

Birders Against Wildlife Crime set their sights on wildlife criminals.

1894 0

It is said that the United Kingdom is a nation of wildlife lovers.  It should then, come as no surprise that a new voluntary group is raising concerns about the lack of progress to eradicate wildlife crime in the UK

Gamekeeper found guilty of killing a rare bird.

1421 0

A gamekeeper has been jailed for four months after being found guilty of killing a rare bird of prey and setting traps illegally to capture others. George Mutch, 48, of Kildrummy, denied recklessly killing or injuring a goshawk and illegally

Court proceedings against a former gamekeeper accused of shooting a protected hen harrier dropped by the Crown Office

791 0

Court proceedings against a former gamekeeper, accused of shooting a protected hen harrier, have been dropped by the Crown Office, who have indicated that after considering all of the relevant material they could not use RSPB Scotland video evidence to